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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN 5
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
votes for sure and he'll probably get in nevada which is six votes, that brings him to 243 votes. if he picked up ohio, then he would have, i think, 261 votes. he would need only nine more votes to climb the presidency. ohio is always important, especially to republicans, i'd say, this year more important than ever. >> we've been talking to voters in all states as they've left the polls today. anthony mason is in the exiting poll information. what did the voters in ohio say? >> the battleground states. the polls have closed, all three of them still right here in the middle in the toss-up column. we want to turn our eyes to ohio and the 18 electoral votes as we've been talking about. look in ohio, it makes up a quarter of the electorate there. john mccain and barack obama just about split this vote. romney has slightly a better advantage, but again, very close. we asked the white working class voters who's more in touch with people like you? again, tight. but asked as who would do a better job with the economy? romney has a big advantage. 53% to 44%. these are white working class voters
this early vote has turned out. look at this. colorado, 77% has already voted. nevada. 72%. north carolina, 63% has already voted. in florida 53%. iowa 44%. and ohio 31%. john dickerson and i were talking about this earlier today. we could have most of the results already by the people that have come out early and that's why the campaigns spent so much time on getting out the vote early, this ground game on these early votes. >> pelley: we'll come back to you early and often. john dickerson is our cbs news political director. john is going to be showing us the various ways that the candidates can get to the 270 electoral votes necessary to twin presidency. john? >> well, first, scott, let's follow up on what bob was saying. we're going to dispatch with 41 of the states, the majority of the country cbs estimates based on the polling that those states are either going to go to barack obama or to mitt romney. that gives barack obama a start where he's likely to get 237 electoral votes, mitt romney is likely to get 191 electoral votes. so here we are at the beginning of the evening, nothing ha
, turnout is crucial. >> turnout has been crucial for three weeks. in other words, in colorado, nevada, north carolina, it may have been crucial before today, but on election day, as nancy mentioned in her piece, republicans have to turn their base out. >> stay with us, we'll be speaking with both campaigns this morning. we begin with david axelrod. david, good morning. >> good morning, charlie. happy election day. >> well, thank you. happy election day to you and everybody else in the great state of illinois. so tell me what it is that's most crucial today for you to win. >> well, you've been using the word, which is turnout. we've been expecting a close election for a year and a half. we've built a tremendous organization. we've got 200,000 or more election shifts volunteers set up. we've got 5,000 stations in neighborhoods across the battleground states. and now it's time to turn out that vote. and that's what this election is going to be about. we are happy about those early vote numbers. those early vote numbers are very significant. we go in with a great advantage. >> one thing t
have to use marco rubio, susana martinez, governor of new mexico, sandoval from nevada, hispanic americans who are republicans to forge a different conversation, because if they don't, this trend line will continue. >> well, i look at african-americans, the situation's even worse for the republican party. they don't have a roster like the ones major just outlined there, and they're doing much worse with african-american voters. >> how is it that the polls showed us that this was extraordinarily tight. many republicans said the polls are wrong, that it's not going to be the same as the 2008 electorate. what did we learn? >> the most important thing in my estimation was the partisan split. you know what that was in 2008? exactly the same thing, and what did republicans tell us throughout this campaign, especially down the stretch? we're not going to see that partisan divide, we're not going to see that split. there will be more republicans. we have enthusiasm, we have intensity, our people are going to show up. guess what, they didn't, or the numbers they had were insufficient to c
for democrats. virginia, montana are important if the democrats could pick off arizona or nevada. but things have been breaking for the democrats the past couple of weeks, i think. >> brown: you haven't had a chance to talk about missouri. >> missouri is a very interesting state where democrats hadn't been earning more than 50% of the votes even when winning because there were other factors. and and there is a third party candidate helping her a little bit. one interesting thing about deb fisher, it's the first time nebraska is sending a woman to the senate. and in new hampshire, the associated press called the democratic governor won there. she will be the only female democratic governor in the country next year because she's won. >> yes. >> brown: is that something you didn't know? did we stump you? >> there is a sitting woman democratic governor right now, but she chose not to seek reelection in north carolina. >> right, so in 2013. >> brown: and back to you, glen and judy. >> ifill: we find it very interesting to see how all this is shaking out partly because we see what's happening on t
they went to nevada, colorado, iowa, wisconsin, ohio, virginia and new hampshire and these are the ones who have been the surrogates with mrs. obama, no, my husband is not a cold fish. we have dinner every night with the kids. you should know him. you should see that smile. i love him. you should love him. mrs. romney who is very close to her husband in the strategy, she plays a bigger role than just being the wife of, she is the one who said, he is not a stiff man. look at us. and, by the way, you talked about the grandchildren. there are 18 grandchildren. 13 of them are boys. >> all right. let us put that to the decision desk and see what that means. okay, barbara, stand by, team. we know you have so much more you're eager to say and we'll take a break at election night headquarters 2012 reporting on one of the great nights in democracy, one of the great privileges it is to vote as the polls still are open and a lot of this country projections come in and we have more, of course, to report on what social media is saying when we come back. >> announcer: multitouchscenes courtesy of microso
on the campaign trail. he will visit wisconsin, nevada and colorado today. governor mitt romney is in virginia, after campaign iing i florida on wednesday. jan crawford filed this report this morning as the romney campaign headed north. >> to say that the hurricane threw a wrench in the presidential election is really an under dstatement. think about it. less than a week to go, the race this tight. both sides suspending campaigning and romney yesterday back on the campaign trail but muting his attacks on the president. and the president yesterday getting to do something romney could not. act as comforter in chief. >> we're going to help you get it all together. i promise, you're going to be okay. >> reporter: he met with victims and officials, reassuring that the government will be there to help. >> we're going to get this whole thing -- we're going to get this whole thing set up. >> reporter: at his side republican governor chris christie, a romney supporter. to show he was moving beyond partisan politics. >> he has been aggressive in making sure that the state got out in front of this incred
seats in play, and when we get out west, california, washington, nevada, something good could happen for them. but it's going to be hard for the democrats to take over the house. >> brown: there a particular one or two you want to keep your eye on especially tonight? >> a lot of the demographic data we're looking at democrats have area where's they can gain, perhaps later on down the line, arizona, texas, as sturks mentioned, florida is another one, where the democrats are look at making long-lasting gains. they're making new seats. california is another one we will be watching. what is the bigger picture when it comes to the type of members of congress? are these people extreme on one part or the other? the way the lines are drawn that can happen. if you draw a district with extreme democrat or republican, you can end up with extremes in congress. >> woodruff: mark, you were telling me you were off the set talking to somebody, picking up some information about how the vote is coming in. >> the turnout right now is that what tino voters are voting at the levels that the obama people
heller of nevada who won on the republican side, really ran separate from -- not against but separate from the party platform and the president. clare mccaskill, john tester, heidi -- from the dakota, joe donnelly for sure from indiana, these are people who won because they were saying i am an independent voice, i will not be beholden to my party. and i think that you have an opportunity -- whether or not they take it and not is quite another question -- but you have an opportunity to have a new center in the scented. it would be mostly made up of democrats, unfortunately. but i think it will be interesting to watch all of these people and how they behave, particularly when it comes to tax reform. i think it is one place where they could be tremendously influential and be the bridge that sort of gets it done. >> terrific. ice build think we have a microphone assistance. let's -- i still think we have microphone assistance. let's play stump the band -- >> i think it is stump the chumps. >> anybody closer already have a microphone? >> what do you see the relationship between the hill an
. the republicans won basically it was two holds in nevada and arizona, again still waiting for results in the senate race in north dakota and montana. the most significant change in the senate last night was the increased number of women. we've reached an historic number of 19 women in the u.s. senate, that includes elizabeth warren who won in massachusetts defeating a moderate republican senator scott murphy. in that race, she becomes the first female senator from massachusetts, a former member of the obama administration and harvard professor. in wisconsin, tammy baldwin defeats tommy thompson, she becomes the first female senator from that state and first openly gay u.s. senator. >> byron, what happened in the house? >> well, in the house it was a status quo election there as well. there the republicans retain control of the house of representatives. they got to the magic number to take back the house. currently there are 226 republicans in the house and as you said a lot of money was spent,bout $2.3 billion on congressional races and when it was all over it was about just like it w
that top-of-the-ticket impasse. >> in nevada. >> johann eck, this is because the district the democrats should be challenging if you want to win a majority. this is a suburban, loss vegas- clark county district. right now, democrats are having a tough time going after heck. the democratic nominee is a former leader in the state house. he has an influential position in the state legislature. he has a record as a firefighter. they are not even mentioning that he is a politician because of that label is not when you want to have. right now, heck has the advantage, but it democrats have a better night than we expect, they would need to do better in this type of district. >> california is a solid blue state for the president, but a couple of interesting house races in that state. >> california, we can almost ignore the state come even though it is the largest state. there have only been one or two seats that had a chance of one party taking over the other. but the citizen legislator redistricting commission and the top two primary that has been turned on its head. democrats need to almost sw
. this is not colorado or nevada or mexico. nonetheless, hispanics in virginia, as in many of the other states, to be very heavily democratic. and so, to the extent they turn out, even if they are only 4% of the statewide votes in any given year, they can assist democrats. let me mention asian americans, because they have become increasingly important in virginia, even though they are a small percentage of the population and the registered population. in northern virginia in particular, they have become exceptionally active. they give a lot of money to candidates. they are predominantly democratic, although slices of the asian-american population, such as vietnamese americans, will support republicans. it goes to show that in a diverse population, virginia has become tremendously diverse. when i was growing up, the white turnout on election day was about 85% of the total. as i mentioned, it's low 70's today. that makes a giant difference. you can tell it in the election results. even a small slice of the population can have a big impact in a state that is increasingly diverse and increasingly
the senate and fell short with candidates in colorado, chris o'donnell in delaware and sharon angle in nevada. then this year, look, if you didn't have the anomalies in missouri and indiana and candidates felt the need to explain their positions on rape and never a good plan in politics, much less just in social conversation -- >> in life. >> in life, yeah. i mean, but even if you tossed those out you are talking about a senate to otherwise be exactly what it was the day before. >> remarkable. >> i think republicans fall in to a trap looking at when's going on in the senate and don't sense a problem in terms of not just messaging but candidate selection. there's a problem of washington republicans in that they have lost the ability to push for the candidates they want in states. there's a backlash against that and need to find a way to connect with their grassroots and find candidates acceptable to the grass roots and competitive. >> absolutely. >> quickly, one thing on the martinez, rubio thing, you're right but it's more than a couple people on the stage and having the policies that want to
, mexico, texas, florida, nevada. we won't have a chance. >> it's tough to have -- explain, gentlemen, we have primaries and we better do something. because we line up with hispanic voters. i think we do. we could argue that for hours. but our values and where we are as a party, but we're in tenuous territory. this election will tell us a lot about it. >> i told them had we started. we're not even going to get to the beginning of all of this. when we come back, we're going to be on something completely different. well, maybe not. but how many times have you heard someone say if so-and-so wins, i'm moving to canada. oh, yeah. we're going to live to our maybe in the north to even see whether or not they want us there. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately
for a little girl in nevada quickly turned into a thanksgiving surprise she is never going to forget. [ cheers and applause ] her dad, sergeant major ronald morse, arrived home from afghanistan three weeks early. he and his wife decided to coordinate the surprise moments after he appeared on the dance floor, his three other kids joined in. it was his final tour of his 30-year military career. congratulations. that's fantastic. >> it's great. my neighbor is even getting in on the elf balloon action. my neighbors across the street, making beautiful balloon animals for their kids. we'll show them to you later. >> coming up, did you know that thanksgiving has some roots in religion? father jonathan morse here to explain and give his holiday blessing next. >> friends at bass pro cooking up the perfect thanksgiving meal. what makes it so special? stick around. trace adkins live from the parade. plus this. [ timers ringing ] [ male announcer ] it's that time of year. time for campbell's green bean casserole. you'll find the recipe at campbellskitchen.com. ♪ campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do
on doors >> i think that is a good thing. the people in ohio, virginia, florida, nevada -- they took this election enormously seriously, understood the unique role they had to play. voters in battleground states understand they have a unique role a lot of us the citizens united to enjoy because they are not and state that will determine the president. >> the super pac's dynamic this time was obviously new and unprecedented. you had senate candidates -- sherrod brown in ohio had $40 million spent against him by super pac's. we had in the last week of our campaign $100 million spent against the president. that is more than the mccain campaign spent in its entirety. remarkable thing. a lot of senate candidates still one. but in house races it had an impact. barack obamashrod brown, governors -- ey have definition. the spending is a little less nefarious. it's still tough to deal with, but you are not somebody who is now and then somebody drops $4 million on youhead will have an impact. we have never seen spending like this. there is a term in politics called gross rating points, the amo
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)